Publicly listed EBOS Group subscribes to HedgebookPro

We are pleased to announce that EBOS Group Limited has recently taken HedgebookPro.

EBOS Group is a publicly listed company on the New Zealand Stock Exchange and has over 2,200 staff headquartered in New Zealand with over 40 offices located throughout Australasia. EBOS Group is one of the largest suppliers of international healthcare brands in the Australasian region.

EBOS Group has multiple entities with various interest rate and foreign exchange derivatives. To effectively manage the financial reporting requirements of these multiple entities EBOS knew they needed a system. Independent derivative valuations, IFRS 7 and IFRS 9 compliance is made easy with HedgebookPro. Hedgebook’s solution fitted the bill with its simple but intuitive approach to a complex area. Cost was also an issue as EBOS Group, whilst being a large company, does not have overly complex hedges and so needed a system which did the basics well.

EBOS Group’s Group Accountant Tonia Johnson said “the key requirements for us were around complying with the accounting standards, specifically doing hedge accounting under IFRS9. Hedgebook covers this off, as well as being easy to use and cost-effective.”

We welcome Tonia and EBOS Group as new HedgebookPro users.

Credit spreads back to pre GFC levels

We have discussed CVA at length in our newsletter and blog as it is arguably the most significant change to the accounting standards, from a financial instruments valuation perspective, since hedge accounting was introduced. The standard relating to CVA, IFRS 13, was developed as a result of the Global Financial Crisis. It became apparent that credit risk had been mispriced for a long time in the lead up to the implosion of the credit markets in 2008/2009. IFRS 13 forces organisations to include an adjustment to financial instruments to represent a credit component – both for the reporting entity as well as the counterparty. The adjustment can be a reasonably immaterial number impacted by factors such as the remaining term to maturity and how far in- or out-of-the-money the derivatives are.

Some companies argue that the relative immateriality of the credit adjustment reduces the necessity of quantifying the credit component, to the extent that some companies are not bothering to do it. We understand that view as IFRS 13 seems like another regulatory requirement that adds little value to the business. However, the standard is explicit in its language that “fair value”, by definition, includes credit, therefore, the decision to do nothing about it cannot pass muster with the auditor.

A contributing factor to the “immateriality” argument is the prevailing benign credit conditions. The credit spread of banks can be observed through the Credit Default Swaps (“CDS”) market. A CDS is like an insurance policy – it compensates the holder of the policy if the underlying entity defaults on its debt obligations. As the chart below shows the credit quality of the big 4 Australian banks has been improving since the spike in 2011 and has continued to retrace back to levels that prevailed pre GFC. The resulting effect is to reduce the credit valuation impact on out-of-the-money derivatives (current exposure method). We would argue that although credit conditions have returned to benign levels it is only a matter of time before another credit shock occurs and companies will be better prepared to quantify such impacts if they already have a tried and tested methodology in place. Our Hedgebook clients benefit from the system’s low cost, easy to use CVA module.

Big 4 CDS 3 year

Infoscan – economical access to financial market data

At Hedgebook we are committed to providing economical solutions to assist the treasury function. Our low cost software, HedgebookPro, provides a treasury management system (“TMS”) entry point for companies that have historically relied on spreadsheets to manage their foreign exchange and interest rate exposures. HedgebookPro is also an alternative for companies that already use a TMS to capture their vanilla derivatives and feel they do not use the full functionality offered by these larger and more expensive systems.

We take a similar approach to financial market data through our company Infoscan. Hedgebook purchased the Infoscan business 12 or so months ago as it is a natural fit for Hedgebook. Many New Zealand market participants of a certain age will remember the Infoscan pagers – they carried a certain cachet at the time! Data is delivered to smartphones these days.

Many companies with exposure to foreign exchange and interest rate markets cannot justify the cost of a Bloomberg or Thomson Reuters product. Websites are OK for accessing spot fx rates on a rough and ready basis but are unsatisfactory for providing the required comfort when entering into larger derivative transactions. Infoscan gives users the visibility over real-time market spot fx rates but, more critically, the fx forward market too. As mentioned, free websites can give an indication of spot rates but accessing accurate forward point information is harder to ascertain.

Whether transacting a new FEC, or adjusting an existing one through pre-deliveries and extensions, it is important for decision makers to have good information at hand regarding the prevailing forward market. Transparency of the forward points provides greater confidence that a competitive market rate is achieved.

Infoscan can deliver data in a number of ways either through a website login or, alternatively, directly into spreadsheets. Like HedgebookPro the market data functionality is delivered in a no fuss, low cost manner and helps enhance fx conversion rates.