When to use zero-premium FX collar options as the method of hedging

For importers and exporters managing trade-related transactional FX exposures, the choice of hedging instrument is just as important to overall performance as tactical/strategic risk management decisions to position at the minimum or maximum of hedging policy limits. Increased volatility in many currency pairs over recent years has naturally increased option premium costs, however it is not wise to always hedge via zero-premium collar options and never consider paying premium to buy outright call and put currency options. The choice between these option instruments and straight forward exchange contracts normally comes down to the following considerations:

  • If the home currency spot rate is at an historical low point against the export receipt currency (say based on long-term average rates) and the lead-indicators point to a greater probability of appreciation of the home currency than further depreciation, the choice of hedge instrument is going to be heavily weighted to straight forwards.
  • If the home currency spot rate is at an historical high point against the export receipt currency (based on long-term average rates) and the lead-indicators point to a greater probability of depreciation of the home currency than further appreciation, the choice of hedge instrument is more likely to be buying outright call options on the home currency.
  • When the currency pairs are trading closer to long-term average levels and there is no clear indication on future direction either way, collar options fulfill the objective of being hedged at an acceptable rate (the cap), however leaving some opportunity to participate in favorable market rate movements at least down to the collar floor level.

In some respect, hedging with collars is akin to having permanent orders in the market to deal at more favourable exchange rate levels with protection on the other side along the way. Whilst zero-premium may appear attractive, FX risk managers should always examine the trade-off’s of paying some premium to widen the gap between the floor and cap strike rates to provide greater opportunity of participation in favourable rate movements. In a similar vein, opportunities should be taken to restructure collars over the course of their term by buying back the sold cap or floor, or alternatively converting the collar to a straight forward if original target hedged rates are achievable. An active mixture of hedging instruments within policy limits should provide greater opportunity to beat benchmark and budget exchange rates.

Roger Kerr is widely regarded as one of New Zealand’s leading professional advisers and commentators on local/international financial markets, the New Zealand economy and corporate treasury risk management. Roger has over 30 years merchant and investment banking industry experience, and has been closely associated with the changes and development of New Zealand’s financial markets since 1981. Roger advises many Australian and New Zealand companies in the specialist areas of foreign exchange risk, interest rate and funding risk and treasury management policy/governance matters.

Roger has provided daily market and economic commentary on the 6.40am slot at radio station NewstalkZB since 1994. 

3 thoughts on “When to use zero-premium FX collar options as the method of hedging

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